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Twitter User Sentenced For Abusive Tweeting In UK

In the United Kingdom, a Twitter user was sentenced for abusive tweets 150 hours of community service

Philip Aladino

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Twitter user in the UK persecuted for publishing offensive tweet | image illustration by Philip Dino (Smarttechvillas)

Summary

  • In the United Kingdom, a Twitter user was sentenced for abusive tweets.
  • Joseph Kelly was convicted of 150 hours of community service for tweeting a “grossly insulting” message to Captain Sir Tom Moore, an Army man who raised money for the NHS during the pandemic.
  • “The only good British soldier is an action one,” Kelly, 36, said the day following his death on Twitter.
  • After he realized how important his actions were, he quickly apologized and took back the message he sent while drunk.
  • For Kelly’s crime, the Scottish courts imposed an 18-month term of house arrest and 150 hours of community service without pay.
  • In the United Kingdom, Kelly was found guilty of violating Section 127 of the Communications Act.

For tweeting a “grossly abusive” tweet against Captain Sir Tom Moore, an Army soldier who collected money for the NHS during the epidemic, Joseph Kelly has been sentenced to 150 hours of community service.

According to report, after walking 100 laps around his property before his 100th birthday, Moore became a household name in the United Kingdom. The Queen knighted him later on. Kelly, 36, tweeted the day after his death, “the only decent Brit soldier is a deed one. Burn auld fella burn.”

The jury returned their verdict in Kelly’s case in February of last year, and she now faces prison time. An often-criticized provision of UK law that permits social media users to be punished for posting “grossly insulting” statements was thrust into the spotlight by this case.


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Kelly was sentenced on Wednesday, according to The National. According to Kelly’s legal team, the tweet was removed barely 20 minutes after it was sent because he had been drinking and because he had few followers on Twitter at the time of the post.

He admits that he was incorrect and that he should have known better. He didn’t know what was going to happen, so he was surprised. Kelly’s defense attorney, Tony Callahan, said, “The genie was out of the bottle by the time he deleted the tweet.” When he realized the gravity of his actions, it was too late to take down the inebriated message, and he quickly apologized and withdrew it.

Kelly was sentenced to 18 months of supervision and 150 hours of unpaid work (CPO) in Scotland. In the United Kingdom, tweets that are thought to be “grossly insulting” could lead to someone being arrested.

Adrian Cottam, who sentenced Kelly, said, “My judgment is that this was a profoundly insulting post. I’ve heard the evidence. The main goal of the deterrent is to show that, no matter how hard you try to remember what happened, when you push the blue button, everything is gone.

Observing how rapidly things may get out of control is critical for others to understand. Due to your lack of resources, you serve as an excellent example.

Section 127 of the UK Communications Act found Kelly guilty. The initial purpose of the legislation was to punish those who made “grossly insulting” statements over the phone, but it has subsequently been used to prosecute social media users who post such remarks. For insulting, assaulting, and harassing prominent people, such as sportsmen and journalists, the Section 127 law has been used to convict hundreds of UK residents, frequently for minor offenses.

The UK’s comprehensive Online Safety Bill is slated to replace Section 127, but opponents are concerned that this new law could permit trials like Kelly’s—with civilians found guilty of distributing “harmful” comments based on broad concepts of public morality.

Source: The Verge

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